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Nemetschek Vectorworks, upcoming events for 2015 webinars

Nemetschek Vectorworks has upcoming architecture and art design webinar events for design thinking and looking at the impact of past master architects.

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Nemetschek Vectorworks Inc “Art Nouveau and its Influence on Architecture” webinar, presented by Steve Alden, AIA, Architect at Nemetschek Vectorworks, will take place on May 28th at 2:00 (EDT) online http://www3.vectorworks.net/ArtNouveau.

It will look at the lives and legacy of two Art Nouveau masters, Victor Horta and Charles Rennie Mackintosh. While distinctly different in their responses to the Art and Crafts movement, both men made important contributions that are universally acknowledged.

Victor Horta: The Original “Steam Punk”

Belgian architect and designer Victor Horta is widely acknowledged as a leading figure in the Art Nouveau style that dominated late 19th century Europe. His fluid and organic interpretations of rigid technology bending to the will of the artist’s hand left a subtle but distinctive mark on an entire generation of international architects who came later, including Frank Lloyd Wright.

Charles Rennie Mackintosh: Unflinching Foe of Artifice

Scottish architect and artist Charles Rennie Mackintosh had a profound influence on European design as the Art Nouveau movement struggled to hold its ground against the overwhelming power of mass production and the strict demands of economic expediency. The popular acceptance of “Japonism” fostered a new worldview imported from Asia and provided Mackintosh with the perfect tools to balance economy, elegance, utility, and form.

Learning Objectives

After attending this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the reasons why the Art Nouveau movement flourished in response to the Industrial Revolution.
  • Explain the significance of Victor Horta and Charles Rennie Mackintosh in the Art Nouveau movement and how their philosophies influenced future designers.
  • Recognize the distinctive characteristics of the Art Nouveau style and identify other practitioners from the era.
  • Differentiate between the Art Nouveau style and the larger Arts and Crafts movement.

“Four Japanese Architects You Should Know” airs July 9th at 2:00 (ET)  The webinar is being presented by Steve Alden, AIA, Architect at Nemetschek Vectorworks.

These four architects – Tadao Ando, Kenzo Tange, Toyo Ito and Shigeru Ban – share a common cultural heritage that views the built environment through a distinctly different lens.

Their vision places high value on emotion, experience, introspection, and harmony. It will also take a close look at several projects from each of these acknowledged masters. Discover how the long history of this island nation has shaped the philosophy and creative output of each of these architects and learn how their personal journeys unfold in, sometimes, unexpected ways.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the history of Japan and how the past influences the decisions made by these acclaimed designers.
  • Recognize the effect of long-established Japanese traditions on contemporary site planning and architectural design.
  • Explain the philosophical and stylistic differences among these architects.
  • Evaluate how these four inspirational Japanese designers influence the work of architects from around the world

To register for this webinar click on http://www3.vectorworks.net/FourJapaneseArchitects.

Reader Comments

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